Frankie Rose

Frankie Rose

Dive, Spectrals, Black Marble

Sat, May 5, 2012

Doors: 8:00 pm

Mercury Lounge

New York, NY

$13 advance / $15 day of show

Sold Out

This event is 21 and over

Frankie Rose
Frankie Rose
As suggested by its sleek op-art sleeve and future-shocked title, Interstellar, Rose’s next album is as welcome as departures get: an icy blend of buffered beats, cascading chords and steely synths. Don’t expect an electro album, however, more like what happens when an indie rock vet spends an extended period of time alongside a proper producer – Fischerspooner collaborator Le Chev.
In other words, if Rose wanted synth lines pulled from the same Kraut-y cosmos as Vangelis and Klaus Schulze, a soundtrack-y slice of Enya or a bass line to sound like the Cure’s Seventeen Seconds, it wasn’t a question of “How?” so much as “When do you want to get started?”
“It’s been exciting finding out what’s possible,” says Rose. “If I can make something sound huge or epic, why wouldn’t I?”
Here’s the deal then: aside from a fall tour with Dirty Beaches, Rose plans on putting 12-hour days in at the studio until her widescreen opus is completed for an early 2012 release.
“Often this album is the scene in the film when the main character is reunited with his lost love, or perhaps like a visit to another planet,“ explains Rose. “I want every song to be like some kind of pop song cinematic adventure.”
Dive
Dive
DIVE is the nom-de-plume of Z. Cole Smith, musical provocateur and front-man of an atmospheric and autumnally-charged new Brooklyn four-piece.

Recently inked to the uber-reliable Captured Tracks imprint, DIVE created instant vibrations in the blog-world with their impressionistic debut Sometime; finding it's way onto the esteemed pages of Pitchfork and Altered Zones a mere matter of weeks after the group's formation.

Enlisting the aid of NYC indie-scene-luminary, Devin Ruben Perez, former Smith Westerns drummer Colby Hewitt, and Mr. Smith's childhood friend Andrew Bailey, DIVE craft a sound that is at once familial and frost-bitten. Indebted to classic kraut, dreamy Creation-records psychedelia, and the primitive-crunch of late-80's Seattle, the band walk a divisive yet perfectly fused patch of classic-underground influence.

One part THC and two parts MDMA; the first offering from DIVE chemically fuses the reminiscent with the half-remembered building a musical world out of old-air and new breeze. These are songs that remind us of love in all it's earthly perfections and perversions.

A lot of DIVE's magnetism was birthed in the process Mr. Smith went through to discover these initial compositions. After returning from a US tour with Beach Fossils, Cole made a bold creative choice, settling into the window-facing corner of a painter's studio in Bushwick, sans running water, holing up to craft his music.

In this AC-less wooden room, throughout the thick of the summer, Cole surrounded himself with cassettes and LP's, the likes of Lucinda Williams, Arthur Russell, Faust, Nirvana, and Jandek; writings of N. Scott Momaday, James Welsh, Hart Crane, Marianne Moore, and James Baldwin; and dreams of aliens, affection, spirits, and the distant natural world (as he imagined it from his window facing the Morgan L train).

The resulting music is as cavernous as it is enveloping, asking you to get lost in it's tangles in an era that demands your attention be focused into 140 characters.

"Sometime" hit stores on October 11th with a second single to follow November 29, culminating in an early March EP release.
Spectrals
Spectrals
Spectrals is 21 year old Louis Jones. Mixing ingredients of pop, soul, doo wop, and a garage rock ballad, his debut album on Slumberland, Bad Penny, sounds vintage but current, while the Yorkshire lilt in his voice (a result of his hometown, Heckmondwike) places him firmly in the UK, rather than Detroit. Inspired by the music he grew up listening to as a child, from the Rolling Stones (the only CD's his mum ever has in her car) to The Style Council, Elvis Costello and The Ronettes (artists he regularly shares on mix tapes) it's all "just about love really."

Spectrals has always been a small operation. Now in its third year of existence, Louis started by recording in a friend's knocked-together studio and posting the songs on MySpace. Despite originally only being for his closest friends, his Myspace soon attracted the attention of discerning labels all over the world: from Captured Tracks (Dum Dum Girls, Wild Nothing) to Sex Is Disgusting (Mazes, Human Hair) to Underground Peoples, where he eventually released last year's Extended Play.

On Bad Penny, recorded with Richard Formby (Wild Beasts, Spacemen 3) in early 2011, Spectrals' knack for writing a great tune is more obvious than ever. "I just love these songs" he says "all I'd hope is for people to come away saying, 'they were 11 ace songs' or if there's a a guy or girl getting messed about, that it makes sense to them. I'm not wanting make out I'm a genius, I hate it when groups do that. People don't like being talked down to, y'know? This is just songs." Packed with great song-writing, smart arrangements and main Louis' distinctive, jazzy guitar, this is one amazingly complete and accomplished debut album.
Black Marble
Black Marble
Black Marble is one of the latest and greatest additions to the Brooklyn synthwave lexicon. Their stark, alienating textures cloister a vaguely hopeful intensity, like a lone and distant rhythm echoing from the hull of a lost deep sea vessel. Reminiscent of early DIY synth recordings, which pitted emotional undercurrents against wan dystopian landscapes, Black Marble's sound struggles to squeeze blood from monolithic concrete.

Collaborators Ty Kube and Chris Stewart take their inspiration from a disparate group of past musicians who dared to mix punk ethics with cold electronics, resulting in an enigmatic, handmade style that recalls the isolated-but-uplifting feel of early European minimal and coldwave music. Triumphantly bleak but undeniably infectious, Black Marble's debut EP Weight Against the Door arrives, appropriately, at the height of winter
Venue Information:
Mercury Lounge
217 E Houston St.
New York, NY, 10002
http://mercuryloungenyc.com