Whitehorse

Early Show

Whitehorse

Brian Dunne

Mon, May 22, 2017

Doors: 6:30 pm

Mercury Lounge

New York, NY

$15.00

This event is 21 and over

Whitehorse - (Set time: 7:15 PM)
Whitehorse
Glam and sleaze, desert grit and subway rats, scum-bags and fakers, hot messes and cold shoulders: welcome to the world of Whitehorse, a rock duo from Toronto.

Whitehorse's brazen sonic breadth encompasses psychedelic surf, arid border rock, lo-fi ingenuity and icy 80's sparseness. Luke Doucet's Gretsch White Falcon and impeccable tone, combined with Melissa McClelland's blazing vocals and badass P- Bass playing, have made the duo's sound is unmistakably, inventively 'Whitehorse.' The duo's songwriting is distinguished by its cinematic fiction, full of flawed characters, foiled plans and anti-fairytales that transform real life into sleek, stylized collages of neo-noir drama and high-gloss.

Whitehorse began as something of a folk duo, but quickly outgrew that box with their inventive instrumentation and resistance to expectation. The duo moved into 'space cowboy' twang territory on the debut apocalyptic full-length The Fate of the World Depends on This Kiss, a fitting title lifted from a Wonder Woman comic. From there, Whitehorse expanded the intergalactic atmospherics with Leave No Bridge Unburned, a chase-scene-velocity acceleration into rock n' roll, with lethal riffs and near indecent vocal heat. Most recently, the duo rebuilt early electric blues for The Northern South Vol. 1, which showcased the duo's adventurousness and enviable guitar collection.

The duo's profile has grown exponentially with each release. The pair now sells out Massey Hall, Canada's most prestigious venue. Last year, Whitehorse won a Juno Award and performed on the award's live television broadcast to millions. Press highlights in the USA, include airtime on NPR's Morning Edition and Weekend Edition, and coverage from Rolling Stone, the Wall Street Journal, Paste and more.

With the new single "Boys Like You," Whitehorse once again mixes things up, adding hip-hop producers and processed beats, and expanding their studio sound with samplers, vintage drum-machines and more. The result is a song that is an irresistible fusion of 90s guitar rock riffs and Brit pop-inspired swells with futuristic, cinematic production.
Brian Dunne - (Set time: 6:30 PM)
Brian Dunne
Bug Fixes & Performance Improvements began as a joke, between drinks number 6 and 7 (7&8? numbers unconfirmed) at a bar down the street from my apartment in Brooklyn, NY. Upon further research (Google), I could not believe there was not an album or book that bore this title so, I set out to write one. 300 songs, 2 years, and 1 near nervous breakdown later, here it lies.

In 2015 I released "Songs From The Hive," a love letter to the music of The Band and Bob Dylan, a tip of the cap (wide brimmed, brown, with a feather) to my folky heroes. And then I hit the road. I played for anybody and everybody, played everywhere anyone would take me; living rooms, cafes, clubhouses, big theaters, small theaters, movie theaters, listening rooms, college cafeterias, etc. Boasting nearly 300 shows in the year and a half that followed, I ended up finding myself in some surprisingly cool circumstances-- and some uncool ones (statute of limitations does not yet allow for me to reveal details). But what I found most liberating was that being a relative unknown had it's perks-- I was beholden to nothing. No one was expecting anything of me, except my cat, and he doesn't give a shit what goes on my record.

So it was with this in mind that I set out to write the next project. Equipped with the title only, I needed just to come up with things that I liked. Should be easy.

As it turns out, I don't like anything. Also, according to the finest head doctors of New York City, I am clinically insane. And while having a conversation with my good pal Liz Longley, who sings with me on track 5 of this here record, she said very simply "well, write about that." And there it was.

Not that this record turned out to be anything like that. Everything takes on a life of it's own, I suppose. But it was the inspiration behind the lead track, "Tell Me Something,” and the others came to me following that one. "Taxi" is a song about the pursuit of something invisible and intangible, and the risk that comes with it. "You Got Me Good" is a song about being a sucker that I wrote so I could sing it at the top of my lungs. “We Don’t Talk About It” is a reflection on how we treat the people we’re closest to, and “Chelsea Hotel” deals with the crutches we lean when our lives are too difficult to withstand. But the record didn’t really take shape until I came up with “Don’t Give Up On Me” one afternoon, sitting at my living room table. It seemed to sum up my mission statement for the whole record. It’s about the devotion to maintaining your idealism as the world makes you more cynical. It’s about putting your chips back on the table after you’ve suffered a big loss. And if you have to lose again, lose in a big way. I love that idea.

With my friend Andrew Sarlo (Big Thief, Nick Hakim, lover of burritos) at the helm, we hit the studio with a great band and tried to flesh out the musical sounds I was hearing in my head (and the other noises). After many pre-production meetings with me rambling about if Lindsay Buckingham had fronted the E Street Band, or Jim Croce on speed or something, we came up with a sound and a vibe that is the trademark of this record. If I tell you anymore, I’ll give it all away. Bill Graham said “always leave em wanting more”. I don’t do that very often. New paragraph.

I hope you like it. I’m incredibly proud of it. I’m gonna go take a nap.

Brian Dunne, Brooklyn, February 2017
Venue Information:
Mercury Lounge
217 E Houston St.
New York, NY, 10002
http://mercuryloungenyc.com