Dent May, The Orwells, Tashaki Miyaki, Foxygen, Calvin Love, Murals, Rafiq Bhatia

CMJ Aquarium Drunkard: No Jacket Required

Dent May

The Orwells

Tashaki Miyaki

Foxygen

Calvin Love

Murals

Rafiq Bhatia

Mondo Boys DJ'ing

Tue, October 16, 2012

Doors: 6:30 pm

Mercury Lounge

New York, NY

$12

This event is 21 and over

Dent May - (Set time: 1:00 AM)
Dent May
Jackson, Mississippi native Dent May grew up singing in local church groups, acting in school plays, and performing at nursing home gigs with a recorder choir. In high school, he wrote synthy powerpop with his band The Rockwells while recording erotically charged novelty tracks with friends on the side. After three unsuccessful semesters at NYU's film school, May moved to North Mississippi where he helped found the Cats Purring arts collective and formed a countryrock band called Cowboy Maloney's Electric City. In late 2007, inspired by Serge Gainsbourg and Lee Hazlewood, he began performing as Dent May & His Magnificent Ukulele and released a digital E.P. of cheeky lofi tunes, A Brush With Velvet. The title is a reference to The Partridge Family, episodes of which May obsessively collected and organized on VHS tapes as a teen. His debut album, The Good Feeling Music of Dent May & His Magnificent Ukulele, was recorded with Rusty Santos in May's home, a doublewide trailer in Taylor, Mississippi (population: 300). He continues to perform with Cowboy Maloney's Electric City, and recently began recording dance music under the moniker Dent Sweat.
The Orwells - (Set time: 12:00 AM)
The Orwells
Terrible Human Beings

You know the kind of song that makes you feel uneasy, but excited? Maybe you felt it the first time you heard The Stooges “I Wanna Be Your Dog” or The Pixies “Monkey Gone To Heaven” -- creepy yet catchy songs that are ominous and playful at the same time. It’s a category that now welcomes The Orwells’ raucous third album, Terrible Human Beings, the Chicago band’s most dynamic and engrossing collection to date.

"Not too far back we sat down to write what we call mutilated pop songs," explains guitarist Matt O'Keefe." “We wanted to make songs that at their core are catchy and pretty, then slash them up,” adds singer Mario Cuomo. "After two misfires we landed on something that felt right," O'Keefe continues, "like an engine failing to start then finally turning itself over. Broken verse - Running chorus. “They Put a Body in the Bayou” was the first song written for this record. Where it came from is lost to us, now. And that’s where Terrible Human Beings begins. Everything in-between is closely related. All these songs ooze over and flood into one another. In “Creatures,” it’s the suspiciously warped guitar line that adds to the song’s funhouse-mirror effect. In “Hippie Soldier,” it’s the eerie, high-pitched backing vocals accompanying the tale of a guy who’s losing his mind. Elsewhere, it’s the subject matter that veers toward the sinister: “Heavy Head” describes vengeful decapitation. And for an album closer Matt O’Keefe describes “Double Feature” as “Our own Hail Mary, a stack of drum loops and guitars and voices coming at you from all different directions. It all collapses in on itself towards the dead end.”

Whereas Cuomo was more focused on the his own tales of suburban malaise for The Orwells 2014 album Disgraceland, he found external inspiration for Terrible Human Beings. Movies such as the psychological thriller It Follows and noir fiction like Last Exit To Brooklyn provided fodder for a more narrative, vignette-based approach. Cuomo also notes that his bandmates challenged him to push beyond his comfort zone lyrically, in a way that reflects The Orwells growing maturity as songwriters. “It’s kind of funny how much our songs and our records have evolved,” says guitarist Dominic Corso, “because when we first started together, we very much had no idea what we were doing. We’ve grown into being able to write legitimately musical songs that we worked hard on and are proud of.”

You can’t blame them for not knowing what they were doing at the start. After all, this is a band they formed in 9th grade, living in Elmhurst, IL and dreaming of escape. When The Orwells started recording their songs and giving out homemade CDs to classmates, their objectives were simple: You make good music, say what you wanna say and have a good time. They released their critically beloved 2012 debut album, Remember When, while they were still in high school, and had already started writing Disgraceland’s songs when they graduated in 2013. And soon, as word of their ferocious live show earned them invitations onto stages around the world, The Orwells were no longer stuck in their hometown. After they came off the road again in early 2015, most of the guys moved out of their parents houses, settling in shared apartments in nearby Chicago. Cuomo even built a skate ramp in the livingroom of a shared loft he dubbed “The Compound,” as a testament to his newfound freedom.

It was around that same time that work on Terrible Human Beings began, with Cuomo, Corso and O’Keefe conceiving the initial ideas. “We wrote these songs in a much more confined way than what we had done with the last records, where it was all five of us in a room,” says O’Keefe. “This time, it would start out with me and Dom with acoustic guitars and Mario on vocals. We’d build the skeletons of the songs, and didn’t take them too far from what we started when we added Grant and Henry.”

Recorded over the course of a month at Chicago’s Electrical Audio, Terrible Human Beings was produced by Jim Abiss, with whom The Orwells had worked on a couple of Disgraceland’s best tunes. “Jim would often times come up with a little something out of leftfield that just made the whole song,” says Corso. “And I don’t think the songs would be as full of energy and grit if it wasn’t for him.” Crafty touches like the backing vocals Corso and O’Keefe contribute throughout the album, or the kraut-rock freak-out at the end of “Double Feature,” augment songs that are otherwise deceptively simple. “The Pixies were an obsession when we were writing this album,” says O’Keefe, talking about the song “Black Francis,” but also Terrible Human Beings, in general. “I think that’s where a lot of trying to make the songs and the guitar parts very simple was coming from, because the Pixies are kings of that. We’ve always been a simple band, but this time it was about trying to keep everything straightforward, nothing flashy.”
Tashaki Miyaki - (Set time: 11:00 PM)
Tashaki Miyaki
"Menace and mystery surround this female Jesus and Mary Chain, whose vocals cut like honey-coated razor blades" - The Guardian

"Tashaki Miyaki has a sound to them that is both very old and new at the same time, with a haunting beauty that fascinates me. Listening to their music brings to mind something of a mix of David Lynch and the Cowboy Junkies, but not because of a comparable look or style, but because of the emotional resonance of their unique sound." - CBS News

"...so pretty I'm afraid saying anything else might diminish it." - FADER

" [Tashaki Miyaki] are being touted as the female Jesus and Mary Chain thanks to dreamy songs like "Somethin' is Better Than Nothin,'" and we're not about to argue." - NYLON magazine

" It has that heavy, heavy, sullen feeling at the start.. and once the sullen vocals kick in I'm totally won over, every single time." - NME
Foxygen - (Set time: 10:00 PM)
Foxygen
Foxygen and Star Power is the Los Angeles songwriting duo of 24-year-olds Sam France and Jonathan Rado. In May 2011, France and Rado nervously handed off a CD-R of this homemade mini-opus Take the Kids Off Broadway (Jagjaguwar, 2012) to producer and visionary Richard Swift after his performance in a Lower East Side club. The duo, who had just mixed and burned the disc that very night, had been devotees of Swift’s outsider-pop oeuvre since high school, when they first began recording their own pubescent forays into oddball rock n’ roll (At least a dozen records were finished before they graduated high school).

Foxygen left the venue that night unsure whether Swift would truly listen or sling the disc into a dumpster on his way out. You’re reading this right now because Swift did listen. In fact, he fucking flipped for Foxygen’s bugged out, esoteric majesty and called upon them immediately to say as much. Eight months later, Foxygen was holed up for a week-long recording session at Swift’s neo-legendary National Freedom studio, creating what became their breakthrough, We Are the 21st Century Ambassadors of Peace & Magic (Jagjaguwar, 2013), a precocious and cocksure joyride across California psychedelia.

2013 saw the mercurial success of 21st Century, and with it, heightened demands for tour planning, added press days, demands on resources, the sacrifice of personal relationships, and the indefinite delay of recording plans. The quick-fire success made for an altogether turbulent 2013 for the band. Foxygen’s always captivating live performances shifted from eruptive to sometimes frightening — and then, just put on ice altogether. But at the close of 2013, France and Rado found secret sanctuary in their new studio, Dream Star, and holing up in some of LA’s most famous hotels for more recording. Writing music together is what their friendship has always thrived upon. At Dream Star in the northernmost passage of LA’s valley, they reformed as a punk band called Star Power. And the result, the svelte, 82-minute …And Star Power, is a morphing, splice-and-paste journey through soft rock indulgences, psych-ward folk, cartoon fantasia, D&D doomrock, and paranoid bathroom rompers. Foxygen, now expanded into a 9-piece touring machine as Star Power, calls the album “a cinematic, auditory adventure for the speedy freaks, skull krunchers, abductees, and misfits…the radio station you can only hear if you believe.”
Calvin Love - (Set time: 9:00 PM)
Calvin Love
This is Calvin Love: He started a punk band in the northern Canadian city of Edmonton at the age of thirteen. The oppressively long, dark, and cold winters kept him indoors making madcap music while summer nights found him tearing up the sleepy streets with rock ‘n’ roll fueled adrenaline. Friends would say he was born with a rebel heart.
After the early years, he left town and has been on the road for the last five years touring dive bars and clubs throughout the US, playing in various bands in and out of Los Angeles. During this time, he managed to create a collage of visions, sounds, and scattered tracks while writing and recording in his bedroom studio, motels, bus stations, or wherever the road happened to lead.
This is Calvin’s first foray into a solo career. Armed with a 4-track, mics, computer machine, keyboards and guitar, Calvin has laid down his debut record New Radar, due to be released this fall on Autumn Tone Records. With backing influences of pop and dance music of the 50’s and 60’s, as well as the punk/electronic/new wave of the late 70’s and 80’s, Calvin Love’s music is a sonic escape into psychological mysteries and enlightened tales of love and death.
For what it’s worth, Calvin’s interests lie in photography, aesthetics, the paranormal, technological adaptations, pirates, The Goonies, zombie apocalypse, Jarmusch, strange states, dancing girls, sleepless nights, D.I.Y., Iggy, Bowie, tombs, hitchhiking, black & white, and the space-time continuum…
Murals - (Set time: 8:00 PM)
Murals
Murals is a collection of the elements set in motion many years ago when the earth was freshly formed. Their Fire Talk debut "Violet City Lantern" is out early 2016.
Rafiq Bhatia - (Set time: 7:00 PM)
Rafiq Bhatia
The music of American composer and guitarist Rafiq Bhatia (pronounced rah-FEEK BAHtia) defies easy categorization. Regardless, groundbreaking artists from different corners of the music world are taking notice. According to jazz drum legend Billy Hart, Bhatia's combination of driving, glitch-inspired beats, blistering improvisation, and expansive production holds "the true potential of the future." In the words of Grammy nominated pianist-composer Vijay Iyer, "his music is innovative and fearless." Valgeir Sigurðsson, who has produced recordings by Björk and Feist, remarks that working with Bhatia "felt like learning a new language." And, speaking about Bhatia's forthcoming debut, Antipop Consortium emcee and producer High Priest proclaims, "this is the type of joint that can exist in both beat and jazz canons successfully."

Since moving to Brooklyn in 2010, Bhatia "has wasted no time grabbing wider attention" (Time Out New York), collaborating with an array of forward-thinking artists including Billy Hart, High Priest of Antipop Consortium, The International Contemporary Ensemble (ICE), Vijay Iyer, Alexander Overington, Valgeir Sigurðsson, Gordon Voidwell, TECLA, and others. He has toured extensively across the eastern and midwestern United States with his quartet, which features Jeremy Viner (woodwinds, processing), Jackson Hill (bass), and Alex Ritz (drums, processing). His performances have been recommended by publications including Time Out New York and The Boston Globe.
Mondo Boys DJ'ing
Venue Information:
Mercury Lounge
217 E Houston St.
New York, NY, 10002
http://mercuryloungenyc.com