Cultfever

Early Show

Cultfever

Hot Sardines

Mon, September 16, 2013

Doors: 6:30 pm

Mercury Lounge

New York, NY

This event is 21 and over

Cultfever - (Set time: 7:30 PM)
Cultfever
The Brooklyn duo Cultfever creates cinematic music in Technicolor. Its sound comes through in 35mm and Dolby-surround, sweeping wide shots, urgent dissolves and auteuristic composition, reminiscent of the brooding, surreal worlds of Almodovar, The Man Who Fell To Earth, and Tim Burton. You don't just hear Cultfever; its music plays out before you like a moving picture, helmed by its dual directors, Tamara Jafar and Joe Durniak. The experience is hyper-sensory, with Jafar and Durniak communicating ideas and motifs to one another using an image-based vocabulary, sharing references and visual cues that build towards grand, anthemic emotions. The result is an abstract visual landscape, a road map of how their songs are designed to make you feel. The pair formed the band quickly after meeting in 2010, sensing an immediate chemistry, and released a self-titled full-length in 2011 as well as the Animals EP in 2013. Playing SXSW, CMJ, Northside, and other leading industry festivals, Cultfever earned praise for both its fiery live show (which includes Ignacio Rivas Bixio on drums and Jafar and Durniak on a combination of vocals, synths, and guitar) and the recordings, with singles "Knewyouwell" and "Collector" propelling the band into the CMJ Radio Top 200. Writing and recording together in their personal studio, Jafar and Durniak share an obvious bond, describing their relationship as "chosen family." Their creative process is malleable, a shared vision that ebbs and flows organically, weaving in each member's ideas to create a cohesive aesthetic. Cultfever extends that reciprocal energy and focus to its live show, Jafar and Durniak's unique connection undeniable and infectious. Now, putting the finishing touches on the second album, the band is releasing the new single, "Gloria," a riveting, beat-driven pop anthem that bursts with dark overtones and moments of blissful synthetic light. Listen, and you can see and feel just as much as you hear; colors swirl, nights fall, suns rise, the spotlight reveals, shadows pervade. The conceptual and sonic density of Cultfever's music rewards repeated listening, like discovering something new in a film you've seen dozens of times. You listen in stereo but you perceive in 3D, synapses firing, roulette wheel spinning, urging you into its world.
Hot Sardines - (Set time: 6:30 PM)
Hot Sardines
Take a blustery brass lineup, layer it over a rhythm section led by a stride-piano virtuoso in the Fats Waller vein, and tie the whole thing together with a one-of-the-boys frontwoman with a voice from another era, and you have the Hot Sardines. (We haven’t even told you about the tap dancer yet.)

In a short time, the Hot Sardines have gone from their first gig – at a coffeeshop on the last Q train stop in Queens – to selling out Joe’s Pub five times in as many months, headlining at Lincoln Center’s Midsummer Night Swing, and opening for the Bad Plus, Lulu Gainsbourg and French gypsy-jazz artist Zaz. Through it all they’ve become regulars at the Shanghai Mermaid speakeasy and turned The Standard, where they play regularly, into their own “saloon in the sky” (The Wall Street Journal) – complete with tap dancing on the bar – honing a live persona that’s been called “unforgettably wild” and “consistently electrifying” (Popmatters).

The Sardine sound – wartime Paris via New Orleans, or the other way around – is steeped in hot jazz, salty stride piano, and the kind of music Louis Armstrong, Django Reinhardt and Waller used to make: Straight-up, foot-stomping jazz. (Literally – the band includes a tap dancer whose feet count as two members of the rhythm section). They manage to invoke the sounds of a near-century ago and stay resolutely in step with the current age. And while their roots run deep into jazz, that most American of genres, they’re intertwined with French influences via their frontwoman, who was born and raised in Paris (and writes songs in both languages).

The band was born when said Parisian (“Miz Elizabeth” Bougerol) met a stride piano player (bandleader Evan “Bibs” Palazzo) at a jam session they found on Craigslist. Above a noodle shop on Manhattan’s 49th Street, they discovered a mutual love for songs from the 1920s, ’30s and ’40s that no-one really plays anymore. Or if they play them, “they handle them with kid gloves, like pieces in a museum,” says Evan, underscoring a point the pair can’t stress enough: “This music isn’t historical artifact. It’s a living, breathing, always-evolving thing.”

“Everything’s kind of being rewritten. And when nothing makes sense, there’s something real and satisfying about going to hear raucous jazz played in a dancehall with wooden floors and brown liquor.” – Miz Elizabeth
Venue Information:
Mercury Lounge
217 E Houston St.
New York, NY, 10002
http://mercuryloungenyc.com