Deep Dark Woods, Hoots & Hellmouth

Deep Dark Woods

Hoots & Hellmouth

James Wallace & the Naked Light, Steven Broderick

Wed, November 20, 2013

Doors: 7:30 pm

Mercury Lounge

New York, NY

This event is 21 and over

Deep Dark Woods - (Set time: 10:30 PM)
Deep Dark Woods
Chills climb spines when sound is given room to unfurl. The Deep Dark Woods’ unflinching pursuit of steadiness between decadence and minimalism is guided at every turn by their intuitive ability to balance grit, clarity, drive and restraint with a sure focus on experimentation.

Winter Hours (2009), caught critics’ ears across the country. The album, a solemn ode to darker themes of seclusion and d…etachment, could yet warm even the bottomless, frozen nights of hometown Saskatoon, SK. With Winter Hours, The Deep Dark Woods won Best Roots Group at the 2009 Western Canadian Music Awards, and Ensemble of the Year at the 2009 Canadian Folk Music Awards. The band also had the runaway winner in CBC’s Great Canadian Songquest with “Charlie’s (Is Coming Down)”, a song about Good Time Charlie’s in Regina.

The Deep Dark Woods frame their music with subtle orchestration; songs are trimmed with minimal embellishments of banjo, piano, with subtle mellotron flutters. Drummer and multi-instrumentalist Lucas Goetz’s layers heartbreaking arches of pedal steel under the clarity and warmth of Ryan Boldt’s voice. Newest member, organ-player Geoff Hilhorst furnishes the songs’ edges with slurred polyphonies, while surefooted, danceable basslines and rich second vocals belong to Chris Mason. Burke Barlow’s clarion guitar tone and lead lines are focused and impeccable.

Their new album, The Place I Left Behind, finds continuity in themes of temporal and geographic alienation, neglected inward trails, and the scars of abandoned intimacies. The album opens with a song about Saskatoon’s rougher edges. “West Side Street” is a study in contrasts – finespun vocals and a gently rolling melody cushion the gloomy story. “The Place I Left Behind” is loosely based on an old folk standard. Gorgeously morose, the title track confirms that The Deep Dark Woods capture lonesome yearning at its loveliest. “Sugar Mama” is a sweet and lively invitation to tap toes and shake off the blues; a seeming coming-of-age story is treated with playful banjo and an airy gait.

A rainstorm over the desert of modern music, The Place I Left Behind offers murder ballads alongside scrappy rockers, lovesick hymnals and slow-dance waltzes. The album illuminates folk traditions without stripping the shadows of roots music history – The Deep Dark Woods wake the ghosts of Appalachia with their prairie gothic pyre-side tales. The Place I Left Behind echoes with traces of time and space that are never fully abandoned or forgotten.
Hoots & Hellmouth - (Set time: 9:30 PM)
Hoots & Hellmouth
Philadelphia's Hoots & Hellmouth blend the twisted roots of American music in a fierce and fiery alchemy. Soulful three-part harmonies co-mingle with stringed things and foot stomps to build a synergy that bursts from both stage and speaker with aural aplomb. It's city and country. It's rock and soul. It's bleeding, sweating, crying, rejoicing…It's alive! Ask anyone who's seen them perform, from Portland, ME to Portland, OR, and they'll tell you the same.
James Wallace & the Naked Light - (Set time: 8:30 PM)
James Wallace & the Naked Light
It was once said that James Wallace would be the kind of guy you'd want on your side if you ever got into a music fight in prison. He'd probably tell you that too, just to clarify his position on not getting into a real fight in prison. That said, his penchant for dark and clever wordplay above eerily-cheery melodies, begs there may be a few twisted stories from his past that we've yet to hear.
Similar to what has often been said of Belle and Sebastian's earlier works, More Strange News From Another Star captures a distinct vintage quality channeled from some non-existent folk music period of decades past. Often referenced to Paul Simon in vocal range and use of textured percussion, Wallace's writing showcases a similar love of African music and Gospel harmonies. But more often than not, his band heads into the more ramshackle, go-for-broke qualities of the early Kinks. A kind of Rock and Roll bred with cacaphony that balances eerily well beneath Wallace's falsetto.
As for the influences in his stories, that is quite the rabbit hole to explore. Whether they be citied from one of his many wandering trips to China, his short residency as a piano player for a small Black Mennonite Church in Appalachia, or an oft mentioned tale about a mysterious box of letters found in an abandoned storehouse concerning aliens and the end of the world, Wallace seems to have a lot to draw on, and that well dosen't seem to be running dry anytime soon.
Steven Broderick - (Set time: 7:30 PM)
Steven Broderick
Steve Broderick is a FORMER New York City based singer-songwriter who, besides being a well-known figure on the New York regional club circuit, has been a touring member of the multi-platinum, arena-filling Trans-Siberian Orchestra (TSO) for 10 years. His second disc, titled Shamrock Eyes, features his well oiled touring band with both a current and classic roots rock sound.
Venue Information:
Mercury Lounge
217 E Houston St.
New York, NY, 10002
http://mercuryloungenyc.com